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.I'll have him drive meto-day--over to Vale, an' then to Huntington.You can go along.That'llbe your last chance to pump him.Have you found out anythin'?"Lenore told what had transpired between her and the driver.Anderson'sface turned fiery red."That ain't much to help us," declared, angrily."But it shows himup.So his real name's Ruenke? Fine American name, I don't think!That man's a spy an' a plotter.An' before he's another day older I'mgoin' to corner him.It's a sure go I can't hold Jake in any longer."To Lenore it was a further indication of her father's temper that whenthey went down to enter the car he addressed Nash in cool, careless,easy speech.It made Lenore shiver.She had heard stories of herfather's early career among hard men.Jake was there, dry, caustic, with keen, quiet eyes that any subtle,clever man would have feared.But Nash's thought seemed turned mostlyinward.Lenore took the front seat in the car beside the driver.He showedunconscious response to that action."Jake, aren't you coming?" she asked, of the cowboy."Wal, I reckon it'll be sure dull fer you without me.Nobody to talk towhile your dad fools around.But I can't go.Me an' the boys air a-goin'to hang some I.W.W.'s this mawnin', an' I can't miss thet fun."Jake drawled his speech and laughed lazily as he ended it.He was justboasting, as usual, but his hawklike eyes were on Nash.And it wascertain that Nash turned pale.Lenore had no reply to make.Her father appeared to lose patience withJake, but after a moment's hesitation decided not to voice it.Nash was not a good nor a careful driver under any circumstances, andthis morning it was evident he did not have his mind on his business.There were bumps in the orchard road where the irrigation ditchescrossed."Say, you ought to be drivin' a hay-wagon," called Anderson,sarcastically.At Vale he ordered the car stopped at the post-office, and, tellingLenore he might be detained a few moments, he went in.Nash followed,and presently came back with a package of letters.Upon taking his seatin the car he assorted the letters, one of which, a large, thickenvelope, manifestly gave him excited gratification.He pocketed themand turned to Lenore."Ah! I see you get letters--from a woman," she said, pretending a poisonsweetness of jealousy."Certainly.I'm not married yet," he replied."Lenore, last night--""You will never be married--to me--while you write to other women.Letme see that letter!.Let me read it--all of them!"Page 58 ABC Amber Palm Converter, http://www.processtext.com/abcpalm.html"No, Lenore--not here.And don't speak so loud.Your father will becoming any minute.Lenore, he suspects me.And that cowboy knowsthings.I can't go back to the ranch.""Oh, you must come!""No.If you love me you've got to run off with me to-day.""But why the hurry?" she appealed."It's getting hot for me.""What do you mean by that? Why don't you explain to me? As long as youare so strange, so mysterious, how can I trust you? You ask me to runoff with you, yet you don't put confidence in me."Nash grew pale and earnest, and his hands shook."But if I do confide in you, then will you come with me?" he queried,breathlessly."I'll not promise.Maybe what you have to tell will prove--you--youdon't care for me.""It 'll prove I do," he replied, passionately."Then tell me." Lenore realized she could no longer play the part shehad assumed.But Nash was so stirred by his own emotions, so carriedalong in a current, that he did not see the difference in her."Listen.I tell you it's getting hot for me," he whispered."I've beenput here--close to Anderson--to find out things and to carry out orders.Lately I've neglected my job because I fell in love with you.He's yourfather.If I go on with plans--and harm comes to him--I'll never getyou.Is that clear?""It certainly is," replied Lenore, and she felt a tightness at herthroat."I'm no member of the I.W.W.," he went on."Whatever that organizationmight have been last year, it's gone wild this year.There areinterests that have used the I.W.W.I'm only an agent, and I'm not highup, either [ Pobierz całość w formacie PDF ]

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